Ice on an April morning

On a cold morning the receding tide leaves a film of ice on the seaweed and rocks along the shore.  Nova Scotia is blessed with natural shorelines like this, a haven for wildlife which is threatened by development.
On a cold morning the receding tide leaves a film of ice on the seaweed and rocks along the shore. Nova Scotia is blessed with natural shorelines like this. It's a haven for wildlife, but threatened by development. More about that in future posts. We feel fortunate to live along an undeveloped coastline.
Ice forms patterns on two species of seaweed.
Ice forms patterns on two species of seaweed.
Chunks of heavier winter ice are heading out to sea, temporarily caught in the overnight freeze, soon to be melted by the warming spring sun.
Chunks of heavier winter ice are heading out to sea, temporarily caught in the overnight freeze, soon to be melted by the warming spring sun.

Ice leaves, buffleheads take over

The ice that yesterday filled the cove has floated out to sea.
The ice that yesterday filled the cove has floated out to sea. The Oak Island Inn (which is not on Oak Island, but overlooks it) is in the distance.
2009-03-28-buffleheads
As soon as the ice had melted, the bufflehead ducks that had all winter occupied the other side of the causeway, the side that didn't freeze, gleefully (I imagine) took possession of the newly open water.

Lunenburg in the glorious winter sunshine

I had to go to Lunenburg today to see a client, and afterwords I walked around and took pictures.  Twas the kind of day that puts smiles on people’s faces.

I’ve just added several of today’s photos to the Lunenburg page of the Photo Album.  I love Lunenburg – the steep hills overlooking the harbour, its history, the generations who have lived there.  It’s special.

St. John's Anglican Church and Lunenburg harbour beyond
St. John's Anglican Church and Lunenburg harbour beyond

Blue Rocks and Stonehurst section

Additions to the Nova Scotia Photo Album include a new section of photos of Stonehurst and Blue Rocks (they were formerly lumped in with Lunenburg), and some new photos in the Lunenburg album.  I’ve also added to the Joggins pictures in the new Bay of Fundy Shore section with photos formerly in the Annapolis Valley section, including those of Baxters Harbour and Cape Split.

I’ve left the Minas Basin pictures in the Valley section, as it is such a part of life in the Valley, but I’m not sure I should. What do you think?  Blomidon has its own section but there are many other Minas Basin pictures that I could put in the Fundy Shore section.

In the old days when people travelled by water, the Fundy Shore was all of a piece.  Nowadays we tend not to associate Joggins with Hall’s Harbour, because it’s several hours by road.

Feel free to leave a comment if you have an opinion on this or any subject pertaining to Nova Scotia. Comments are moderated.

New pictures of Lunenburg, Joggins, panoramas

I’ve just added a new section called “Fundy Shore” with some photos my mother took of the Joggins cliffs which are full of fossils and home to a popular museum.  Also there are some new photos of Lunenburg, notably of Bluenose II as,  loaded with passengers, she gracefully left her berth and headed out to sea, absolutely dwarfing the other boats, including ours, that were moored in the harbour.

There are also a few new pictures in the Panoramas section.