The big storm

The February 15-16 storm that completely buried cars in Prince Edward Island continues to make life difficult for Nova Scotians more than a week later. Tall snowbanks make driving and walking difficult and dangerous, especially in the towns. Elsewhere, snowshoes are the vehicle of choice. Clogged or hidden storm sewers result in flooding when it’s warm(ish) and thick ice when it’s cold, especially in Halifax.  Around Mahone Bay, people have been removing snow from roofs and decks to mitigate damage and leaks, especially whenever rain threatens. What a winter!

After the storm

Ice pellets
Ice pellets

We had a whopper of a nor’easter last night. Schools closed early yesterday and it was a foregone conclusion that they’d be closed today. Many offices in the Maritimes are closed today.

Here close to the Atlantic coast, we had little rain though it was forecast. It came down as ice pellets. The top couple of inches are made of ice pellets, averaging about 1 mm in diameter.

We I don’t often get to ski on our road before it’s plowed, but at time of writing it still is covered, though it seems that 4-wheel drive trucks can get through.

As you can see, the snow drifts around to collect on the sheltered, south-facing side of my swingset greenhouse.

Helicopter Blows Deer to Safety on Ice-Covered Antigonish Harbour

The ice was thin and very slippery. Retired biologist Ian Waugh spotted the deer in trouble. He called the Department of Natural Resources.

There was no chance of anyone going out on the thin ice to help the deer. So DNR sent a helicopter. Look how close to the deer the pilot is flying to give it the maximum downdraft effect from the propeller blades.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ccqfe7vrGuA

An informative news report on the story is here on CTV.ca.